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    Wikipedians Against “Unrestricted Warfare”

    Some Wikipeadians are usuggesting the article for the book Unrestricted Warfare should be deleted:

    I think it’s fair to say that while it does seem to be based on an authenic document, the translation and emotive cover of the book has the smell of a black propaganda effort, or at the very least, irresponsible sensationalism. This would not be inconsistent with the proto-neocon organisation Team B’s mistranslations of Russian documents in the late 1970s, and related CIA misinformation which indirectly convinced the then head of CIA William Casey into believing the agency’s own lies, lies suggesting that Russians were the masterminds behind seemingly unrelated global terrorist activities.”

    Wow.

    This is an important book which put out many concepts into the mainstream of national security thinking.

    I agree the article isn’t the greatest, and have suggested an alternative outline:

    The article should be something like this:

    1 Intro
    2 Authors
    3 Version
    3.1 Chinese Version
    3.2 FBIS Version
    3.3 FBIS abridged version
    3.4 Print Version
    3.4.1 Cover & Subtitle Controversy
    3.4.2 Introduction Controversy
    3.4.3 Publisher Controversy
    4 Overview of the Concepts
    5 References
    6 Other Links

    10 Responses

    1. Once again, Wikipedia may prove to be a 5GW battleground!

      What if the critics of the Unrestricted Warfare page are actually trying to shift eyes from the subject, eh? heh. Perhaps creating a controversy out of the issue is one way to delegitimize it.

    2. The Asia Times carried a two-parter:

      Introduction: The smart colonels
      By Fabio Mini

      The weapons revolution
      By Qiao Liang and Wang Xiangsui

      The Asia Times also mentions the book in this article:
      ANALYSIS
      Bush’s lone military superpower vision
      Part 3: The nature of future wars and US strategy

      By Uwe Parpart
      Editor, Asia Times Online

      Max Boot also wrote about the book in the LA Times, although my link to the original op. ed. doesn’t work; it’s reprinted at the Council of Foreign Relations however: “China’s Stealth War on the U.S.

      Of course, Hammes also mentions the book in The Sling and the Stone.

      Interestingly, a search on Amazon returns several books that mention it. One, The Tao of Deception: Unorthodox Warfare in Historic and Modern China, January 2007, by Ralph D. Sawyer, seems interesting, actually. You can use Amazon to search within the book here; just type in “Unrestricted Warfare” to find 6 references to Unrestricted Warfare in that book!

    3. In fact, I’ve added the Sawyer book to my shopping cart!

    4. While I wouldn’t buy the book on Amazon, which is a blatant steal from the free version on the Internet, such as at the ConflictWiki, they should keep the entry in Wikipedia.

      Did you know that you can’t edit your own biographical wikipedia entry? Did you also know that any ramshackle “newspaper” that may have zero morals or knowledge may be cited as a source? Odd that with that level of authenticity required they’d want to kick out a book on UrW.

    5. The article has been marked for deletion.

      The promoting the deletion also seems to edit/cleanup the George Soros entries. How’s that!

    6. I bought the book at Amazon because I was too lazy to print and bind the the PDF.

    7. Thanks for the links Curtis. I will use them in defense of the book. I will get the Sawyer book too.

    8. PSlog,

      My copy of the Sawyer book has already shipped. Woo-hoo! Any day now, I’ll be diving into it.

      Doing a search on the book, I noticed that Kent’s Imperative had already listed the book as being on his/her/their reading list. I’d skimmed that post but skipped over the titles.

    9. I have the book on my to-buy list…but it will be months till I get to it.

    10. […] – Unrestricted Warfare by Qiao Liang and Wang (see also PDF version, this, this, this, this, and this) […]

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